21 thoughts on “Some Thoughts On Vehicle Threats”

  1. What are they all yelling? Sounded like Metro! Metro!
    I can’t believe they’re that proud of their local public transport, but then again, I’m not a well-traveled man and Mexican drug cartels have always been known for their civic pride. You can tell they love their hometowns by how hard they fight to control them.

    It looks like a threat to me. If the Kill Dozer was a threat, a bunch of dudes in homemade armored trucks with M16s, MGs, armor, and helmets is no joke. Didn’t these guys take on, and beat, a city police department last year in a running gunfight? I saw them using .50s against the city cops. It looked like a very one-sided fight.

    The fact they can put on this little parade out in the open doesn’t bode well for the Mexican govt.

    I assume we can expect to be intervening in another Mexican civil war in the not-too-distant future.

      1. It’s Tuesday, so shouldn’t you be getting ready for Euchre Night at “your” bar?

  2. The one thing I noticed was, as stated in the article, the lack of brush guards. Also, for all the up armoring of the passenger compartment it looks like the grille area is still stock. The radiator is really delicate, and a full power hunting/battle rifle round will go right through that grill, the heat exchangers and do serious, terminal damage to the engine. Shotgun slugs are good for this too. .50 cal ideal. It’s possible there’s some armor behind the grills, but you can only block a radiator so much before you have problems. Kill the cooling system kill the vehicle. After that, apply flammenwerfing as needed. Looks like they really like Ford Super Duties, I’d have figured they would prefer Chebby.

    1. When I was a kid, my dad always said he wanted a 45-70. He told me a story about a guy from Lumberton, NC who shot a man with one in his truck. And killed him. Through the engine block. That gave him a great deal of respect for that round. Having shot one since, I totally agree.
      Even if you shot one and missed me, I’d still soil myself.

      A buddy of mine was Cav. He told me lots of loose concertina does wonders. One night in Baghdad, they ran their Stryker through a bunch of concertina and spent the rest of the night trying to unscrew themselves. The concertina was sucked up into the axles and turned into an impossibly nasty Gordian Knot. The tangle devoured everyone’s multitools and took hours to reduce. They were almost completely immobilized by some cheap wire.

      1. Yeah, and the 45-70 will outshoot a tank too!!!!!!! The myths surrounding that cartridge never cease to amaze me. Having owned several, from 3 trapdoors to 2 newer Marlins I can speak from experience, it’s a big cartridge but most big magnums will easily outshoot it, in both accuracy and power. But it has that cowboy mystique to it, can’t beat that.

        Doesn’t everyone carry a set of fencing pliers in their vehicle?

      2. “A buddy of mine was Cav. He told me lots of loose concertina does wonders. One night in Baghdad, they ran their Stryker through a bunch of concertina and spent the rest of the night trying to unscrew themselves. The concertina was sucked up into the axles and turned into an impossibly nasty Gordian Knot. The tangle devoured everyone’s multitools and took hours to reduce. They were almost completely immobilized by some cheap wire.”

        Agreed. did exactly the same thing with an M-113 APC at a Ft. soon to be formerly named after a Confederate general. We threw a track after driving through a single coil of concertina and had to dismount and repair with onboard prybars etc. It was hours long work even with experienced crew guiding the effort. Female personnel proved to be utterly useless in the hard work of getting the track repaired , just as they were with the heavy work of loading for the field, but you all knew that.

    2. We discussed this here yrs ago, for those of you with large caliber hunting rifles (.338 WM-.458 WM) look for ‘old’ Hornady FMJ bullets at gun shows/pawn shops. The older ones from about 10-40 yrs ago were steel jacketed,test with a magnet.
      My .375 H&H and .416 Taylor are loaded with 300 and 400 gr steel jacket FMJ for those times when you care to send something a little harder/heavier than a S.P. A 400 gr. FMJ @5,000 fpe and a radiator/ engine block don’t mix well. Can’t imagine what it will do to a chest plate either, jellied chest cavity.
      Most shotgun slugs are made of soft lead and don’t have the velocity like a large magnum rifle, they won’t penetrate much metal, just flatten out. However there are hardened specialty ones available.
      But like with everything else today, things are getting scarce.

  3. The one thing that all of these fools, carrying miss-matched weapons and these vehicles have in common is thus: they are all highly vulnerable to jellied-gasoline in the form of the venerable ‘Molotov Cocktail.’

  4. A friend had a calthrop used in Nicaraugua that was made from 5/16? steel tubing and stood about 10 inches tall – how are you going to move a jersey barrier? Small tank barriers (big calthrops) could be fabricated from angle iron, maybe 4 ft long, holes or loops to run cable and barbed wire. These could be set up quickly by 4 guys in a pickup

  5. I was thinking on the tires too, it’s not like these things are tracked or anything, what’s some gel-gasoline do to a LT tire/wheel combo at 80psi? I’m just thinking that could be a fun ‘science’ experiment if you lived in the country and had a spare tire and wheel you didn’t mind sacrificing…

      1. Got styrofoam? Got petrol? Got a coupla longneck bottle scrounged from ditches? Geez.

        1. We used a 5 lb box of powdered Tide per 55 gal drum of gas in our improvised fougasse.

          Add in some drain oil for longer lasting fun.

  6. Above mentions 338lm, I shoot a 338lm, my range has 30 ar 500 steel targets, never been able to punch the steel, that’s 250 g or 300g, bullets.

    Unaware of any black tip rounds, LOVE to get my hands on a 500 of em, if only I knew where to purchase. Lol

    Dirt

  7. I’ve watched videos and seen pics of the effects of cartel firefights. They do lay down an immense amount of fire power. Do not under estimate them. And they are on this side of the border. Sinaloa cartel and Latin Kings work together.

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